Information

High fat consumption is linked to the occurrence of breast cancer

High fat consumption is linked to the occurrence of breast cancer


A recent study shows evidence that a high-fat diet can promote breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Animal tests show that higher fat intake may increase the chances of cancer, but studies on the human body have not been considered relevant. For the study conducted by the National Cancer Research Institute of the United States, 188,700 women were asked about their diet and it was found that there is a link between breast cancer and fat intake. The people interviewed by the American researchers were between the ages of 50 and 71 and were in the post-menopausal stage.
The interviewed women were asked to rate 124 different types of food, from "never" to "six times a day" and to specify in what quantity they consume those foods. Out of the total number of women followed during the study, 3,501 were affected by breast cancer. Those who consumed more fatty foods were 11% more likely to develop breast cancer than those who consumed less fat. The increase of the risk of the occurrence of breast enlargement was influenced by the consumption of saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats. Factors such as family history of breast cancer, smoking, body weight index and alcohol consumption were not considered relevant.
In the almanah published by the National Cancer Research Institute, Dr. Annie Thiebaut states: "Among post-menopausal women who participated in the study, we detected a direct link between fat intake and the risk of cancer." The authors of the study suggest that research carried out by other doctors could not establish this link between fat consumption and the occurrence of cancer, because during the study people who obtained 20% of the energy required for fat consumption were not supervised, which made it more difficult. establishing a difference.
Researchers also point out that fats can influence the risk of cancer by stimulating hormone production, but more research is needed to better understand the risk. However, in an editorial in the same almanac, researchers Stephanie Smith-Warner and Meir Stampfer of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston said that it is more important to control fat in a woman's body to prevent cancer than to prevent cancer. they tracked the amount of fat they consume and added: "Detection through studies and clinical trials of links between a diet based on fat and the occurrence of cancer are very modest, besides the very conclusive evidence that shows the connection between the amount of fat in body and the risk of cancer in women who have reached menopause. "
Dr. Emma Pennery, a nurse at the British Breast Cancer Care Foundation, said: "It is not yet known that a high fat diet can lead to cancer; studies by other researchers have not reached the same conclusions, so we are somewhat far from being very sure of these connections; however, a high fat diet can lead to weight gain and it is accepted that a higher body weight, especially in menopausal women, can increase the risk of breast cancer. " Dr Sarah Rawlings, Head of Breakthrough Breast Cancer, says: "Whether you have reached menopause or not, and your body weight has exceeded normal limits, you may experience several health problems, including heart disease, high blood pressure and several types of cancer; if you maintain a normal weight throughout your life, you can reduce the risk of multiple diseases. "
March 23, 2007